Tailor Form
Send your Messages and Pictures over WhatsApp :07884 361546
UK :0800 5200937
UK Office :0800 8620035
Ask Your Questions
News - Why Turkey?
  • Private Gazi Hospital
    Private Gazi Hospital has been audited on regular time intervals by the National Private Hospital Auditing Body. Reports of auditing body has indicated that there has not been any case of MRSA which has been detected at the hospital so far.
    Click Here
  • Dr Cenk Tokat
    Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetics Surgeon
    Click Here
  • Professor Ahmet Seyhan
    Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetics Surgeon
    Click Here
  • Dt. Baris Ozgur
    Cosmetic Dentist and Dental Implant Specialist
    Click Here
  • Associate Professor Serdar Kacar
    Associate Professor Serdar Kacar, General Surgeon, Obesity Surgery Specialist
    Click Here

Why Turkey ?

 

Medical care in medical centres and hospital in Turkey is provided by board-certified physicians, many of who have previously trained in top U.S. or European medical programs. The quality of care is equal, and in many cases far superior, to that available in the UK. Most doctors speak English fluently, with private hospitals in the tourist areas having many English speaking staff.

 

The cost of medical care is lower than in the UK due to the lower cost of living, lower staff and doctor’s fees and cheaper medication. In addition, the cost of medical care is lower because there is significantly less administration and paperwork. The vast majority of private patients in Turkey pay the doctor or medical centre directly. Unlike the UK, there is no administrative paperwork associated with insurance claims or approval of care for private patients in these countries. The cost of medication and treatment, including dentistry, is typically about half the price of the UK and “medical tourism” is a growing trend with patients travelling from the UK and Western Europe in increasing numbers for dentistry, fertility treatment, cosmetic surgery and other surgical and medical treatments.

 

The Quality of Medical Education in Turkey

 

A Short History of Medical Education in Turkey

 

During the Ottoman Empire, the first examples of medical education was described in 1470 when Dar al Shifas built the Fatih Complex (Kumliyesi) in Istanbul, which eventually became the origins of the first Faculty of Medicine. The second institution was the Suumlleymaniye Dar al Shifas and Medicine Madrasa (School) which came into service in 1557 as the Suumlleymaniye Complex (Kumliyesi). In 1806 the Tabiphane military medical school, based in Spitilia Hospital was opened, specifically to train contemporary physicians and surgeons.

 

Any western influence upon Turkish medical education was not seen until 1827, when the Schools at Tibhane-i Amire and Cerrahhane-i Amire were founded and were later re-named as one organization, 'Mekteb-i Tibbiye-yi Sedilahane', after becoming a modern education institution, influenced by the French medical fraternity.

 

Over the years, and probably related to the increased use and influence of foreign languages, the number of physicians became less until the establishment of 'Muumllki Tibbiye' a civilian School of Medicine which used native Turkish as its language of tuition. Eventually the military and civilian schools of medicine were united as one Faculty of Medicine in Haydarpascedila in 1909 (Establishment and Historical Development of Istanbul Medical Faculty 2008).

 

After the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, Mustafa Kemal Atatuumlrk founded the Republic of Turkey in 1923. In parallel with the directives of Ataturk, the first modern Faculty of Medicine, 'The Istanbul Faculty of Medicine', was established after the university reformed in 1933. Through these early years of development, and after the foundation of the Turkish Republic, a limited number of Faculties of Medicine were opened, eventually totalling 7 by 1970, and growing to reach a total of 60 by 2007. Currently, 42 of the medical faculties provide undergraduate education. Of these, 7 are private universities, and the others are state universities. A military medical school was founded in Ankara in 1980.

 

General Background Information

 

Currently, all the universities in Turkey, though they are self-governing in medical education, are affiliated to either a governmental or a non-governmental organization. One of these organizations is The Council of Higher Education, which is an autonomous body with a legal responsibility governing all higher education, directing the activities of the institutions of higher education within the context of duties and powers given by the Higher Education Law.

 

There is another institution whose main responsibility is the selection and placement of the students for medical faculties as well as for the others. The Student Selection and Placement Centre (Turkish OSYM) is affiliated to the Higher Education Council, determining the numbers of student places at each university and on each faculty programme. This centre evaluates students' subject grades, high school results, and student preferences according to the faculty/programme requirements by specific assessment procedures.

 

Another professional organization, the Turkish Medical Association (TMA) (Turkish TTB), serving as a public institution and aiming both to protect and to evaluate the professional rights of all physicians, was founded in 1953. It plays a major role in both core curriculum and assessment processes and in Continuous Medical Education (CME) and European Union Cohesion Programmes. In line with the global studies standardization of medical education, the Universities, the Ministry of Health and Turkish Medical Association have collaborated to develop the National Core Curriculum. As a result, the requirements of the nation have been reviewed and the studies on institutional curriculum have been accelerated.

 

Undergraduate Medical Education

 

Students, who have completed a twelve year primary and secondary education and who are in the top 1.5 percent of achievement levels, are accepted to the medical faculties of the universities in accordance with the results of the multiple choice question (MCQ) examination organized by OSYM. The undergraduate medical education normally lasts 6 years. However this can extend to 7 years, due to the English preparatory programme in 21 of these medical faculties. English is the medium of instruction in only three of the Turkish medical school.

 

The Turkish Medical Association has, every other year since 1997, produced a survey of all the medical faculties and publishes a national report on undergraduate medical education. The last one of these reports presenting very valuable information about medical education in Turkey was published in 2006. According to this report, a total of 32.807 students were currently attending the medical faculties, and each year produces 5000 graduates. Table 2 displays the total academicians, the number of students and staff-student ratios during 1997-2006. A total of 4066 professors, 2379 associate professors and 2584 assistant are presently working in medical faculties throughout Turkey. Twenty six percent of the professors and associate professors are working part time. Although the number of students per academician seems quite acceptable, an unbalanced distribution of academics throughout the universities and high percentage of the part time faculty has a perceived negative effect upon medical education.

 

Currently, medical graduates are eligible to practice after the 6 years of education in medical school as general practitioners. While family doctors are synonymous with general practitioners in most countries, they are distinct in Turkey. Family doctors receive an additional three years of training. The Turkish Government commenced the implementation of a comprehensive reform programme named 'Transformation in Health' in 2003. Even though the Ministry of Health claims that this programme will strengthen the primary health care, its effects on either undergraduate or postgraduate medical education is unclear.

 

Models of Medical Education

 

The traditional Flexnerian educational model is probably the first medical educational model seen in Turkey, based mainly on the German and French models in higher education. The Hacettepe Medical School started the first integrated curriculum in 1963 when it changed its curriculum to the American-influenced Case Western Reserve University model. Between 1963 and 1997, almost one half of Turkish medical faculties began implementing integrated curricula.

 

The University of Cukurova implemented a community oriented medical education in 1972, whilst the Dokuz Eylul School of Medicine (DESM) made a fundamental change in its curriculum from traditional to problem based learning (PBL) in 1997. DESM is the first medical school in Turkey to implement a true PBL curriculum, whilst there have been many innovations in the education models of other faculties within the last ten years. 

 

Medical education, grounded in community-based learning is found in 27 of all faculties, and the one of the best examples is found at the University of Cukurova. The application of community based learning at the University of Cukurova, starting from the first year, enables the students to familiarize themselves with and work on real clinical material, the patients, and within appropriate health institutions. The oldest of these community programmes (almost 30 years old) has provided the graduates with the opportunity to practice in seven different rural health centres where they are accommodated for a month. In addition, health institution visits, first aid courses, the interactive courses on health education and counselling, and the applications of family visits by both public health and family medicine departments and practicals held at primary health centres have been added over the last ten years. For the last three years, the health education, counselling and health institution visit programmes in some schools have promoted interprofessional learning; in collaboration with local Governmental organizations such as the local office of Social Services, local health and education authorities and their subsidiary health institutions.

 

Postgraduate Medical Education

 

All entry into postgraduate medical specialization programmes was previously through faculties of medicine, university hospitals and training hospitals owned by the Ministry of Health and Social Insurance Institute, and private foundations. Postgraduate students were recruited for specialization via non-standardized exams administered by the University departments, and the state training hospitals recruited its postgraduate students via their own central examination. However after 1986, and in order to comply with the OSYM, the entrance assessments were centralized, with all potential applicants having to pass a common MCQ assessment. Those candidates who achieve the highest grades are placed into the specialization programmes, pre-determined by the Ministry of Health, in discussion with the various postgraduate departments. In the 2003-2004 academic year, 15,892 postgraduate students were enrolled for specialized programme education.

 

Having finished their training, the new physicians, surgeons and practitioners, are expected to do one year compulsory community service, the placement decided on community-need (those regions requiring more community physicians are given more new recruits). 

 

In Turkey, there is at least one professional association for each area of specialization. The associations deal with such activities as development and assessment of relevant curricula, board examinations, certification, and continuing medical education activities. In addition some of them work within the framework of the EU and cooperate with the development of a European Union perspective on common medical staff development.

 

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

 

Following their workshops during 1991, the Continuous Medical Education Accreditation Council was developed and eventually designed (CMEAC 1994). The guidelines and principles of accreditation in 1994 the pan-representative Council meets monthly and evaluates all the accreditation applications. The guideline and principles include the objectives of the CME Accreditation system, qualitative and quantitative development of CME activities carried out throughout the country and their provision and promotion. The accreditation guidelines and principles were revised in 2006, when the activities to be accredited were divided into two groups:

 

  • Those activities generally requiring active and often face-to-face participation and
  • Those that involve distance-education activities.

 

The system also covers financial rules, definitions of the activities, the prerequisites and the ethical and professional requirements of programmes. The process of individual accreditation is traced through a data based programme before and after the application of accreditation. Applicants can reach only their own private database information.

 

On average about 6000-8000 hours of CME are conducted annually within the country; of these almost 40-50% by specialization associations, 30-40% by universities and 15-20% by the TTB and the Chamber of Physicians. The provinces where the activities have been most commonly conducted are Istanbul, Ankara, Idotzmir, Antalya and Bursa. However, a study carried out in 2006 revealed that CME activities conducted in 78 provinces in different times gradually became widespread throughout Turkey.

 

Following the protocol signed, in 2006, between the Turkish Medical Association (Turkish TTB) and the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) the two institutions now cooperate in the mutual recognition and affirmation of accreditation, based upon continuous medical education and professional development activities (Akyol 2006). It is generally accepted throughout the world that participating in continuous medical education (CME) and professional development (CPD) activities should be voluntary. However, according to the requirement of the documentation for continuous medical education and licensing, participation to these activities in Turkey will be compulsory. The Co-ordination Council of Medical Speciality Societies in Turkey supports its member societies to prepare their own programmes for CME and CPD. CME credits will be an obligatory part of the board examination. This will be the first step to using these credits in the certification and re-certification of the doctors in Turkey.

 

 
Compare the Cost of Breast Enlargement
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
5000 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
7700 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
Compare the Cost of Breast Reduction
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
6000 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
8900 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
Compare the Cost of Breast Lift
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
5500 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
7700 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
Compare the Cost of Face Lift
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
6750 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
12000 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
Compare the Cost of Forehead Lift / Lateral Brow Lift
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
4150 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
7500 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
1300 £ (inc. Round-way flight, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.)  
Compare the Cost of Nose Surgery / Rhinoplasty
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
4000 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
7000 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
Compare the Cost of Upper and Lower Eyelid Surgery
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
4000 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
7000 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2100 £ (inc. Round-way flight, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis)or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
Compare the Cost of Tummy Tuck / Abdominoplasty Surgery
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
6000 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
8800 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.)  
Compare the Cost of Liposuction
UK
US
RevitalizeInTurkey
5000 £ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
6000 $ (inc. Hospital and doctors' fees)
2700 £ (inc. Round-way flight, 1 night hospital stay in a fully-equipped private hospital, all professor doctors, post-operative medications, post-op after care facilities, accomodation in special patient villa (full-board basis) or in residential complex, transfers to medical outings and airport, bilingual assistants etc.) 
 
Are you ready to change?